Pantone In Gamut

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I want to create a list of blues which we can use in our designs which we can count on being in gamut for the various printers we use. How can I tell which colors in this color list are in gamut (or which are out of gamut) for this profile?

Trim your color list

You might start by editing out the colors in your color list that you know are not to be included (in your case, all the non-blues.)

Blue1.jpg
Blue3.jpg

Bring the color list into Worksheet

  1. Open up your color list into the Worksheet in ColorThink Pro.
  2. Change the Color List displayed from Lab to LCH.
  3. Click the column heading "H" to re-order all the color according to hue order. This will put all colors of the same hue into the same range, and makes it easy to find all the blues.
  4. Scroll through the rows of colors and highlight all the blues (shift+click to highlight a whole section or Alt+click / Apple+click to highlight individual rows.)
  5. Click the color list name to reveal options, and choose Graph List. This opens the color list into the Grapher and marks all the selected colors with white cross hairs.
  6. Uncheck "Tone using L*" to make the colors more visible.
  7. Bring your profile into the Grapher (for example, GRACoL2006_Coated1v2.icc)
  8. As you remove the highlight in the worksheet from the more obviously out of gamut colors, the corresponding cross hairs in the Grapher plot will likewise disappear.
  9. Continue in this way until all the cross hairs points are contained in the volume of the graph.


Be sure to arrange the windows so that you can view the Worksheet next to Grapher. Using the Worksheet in conjunction with the Grapher will make it easier to identify which colors are in gamut.


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